STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering & Math) is a hot topic in the education world. It seems everywhere you go STEM is definitely in! But STEM goes beyond computers and tablet apps. High quality STEM experiences develop critical thinking skills, increase science literacy, and enable our life long learners. By increasing exposure to science attitude and engagement, we can have a positive & lasting impact on the youth in our programs. Luckily our programs can be the key to raising the quality of STEM experiences.

High quality, well-facilitated STEM activities encourage youth to be curious, ask questions, and make connections with the world around them; essential skills for success in life. This ties into Wonders goal of elevating the quality of our social emotional learning this year. That is why we are campaigning to raise $9,000 by December 31, 2016 to  help us meet our goal and increase STEM and technology in our programs!

Donate here!

Whether introducing these concepts in our early learning programs or building on the knowledge of our school age children, Wonders teachers are enthusiastic about the possibility of expanding this area of the curriculum. Here are ways that we are already teaching science, technology, engineering and math concepts.

The Disappearing Candy Cane

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Our  dissolving candy mystery is a great visual science experiment which you can also add some math too! The kids got an opportunity to help with set up, describe what they saw and smelled, and try to figure out why the candy canes dissolve.  

Lights! Camera! Action!

Our kids love to transform into directors, producers and performers of their very own productions. By engaging their creativity they also use video editing software to create their masterpieces.

Scientific Methods with our Youngest Learners

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Did you know that even babies are able to follow scientific methods? It’s actually an everyday occurrence as they observe, hypothesize, experiment, analyze and reproduce positive results. By using pattern blocks to work on recognizing, extending, and creating patterns of two or more elements children are expanding their geometry concepts.

 

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