Mounting evidence suggests that children who do well in math at an early stage have greater chances of success in school and overall achievement. Math is a tool for children to develop critical thinking, learn how to problem-solve, and make sense of the world. Teaching early math builds on children’s natural inclination to play with numbers, shapes, and other aspects of math from as early as their infant and toddler years.

Math however goes beyond just numbers. Here are ways that parents and educators alike can help foster the development of math skills in our children.

In the toddler years, you can help your child begin to develop early math skills by introducing ideas like:

 1. Number Sense

This is the ability to count accurately—first forward. Then, later in school, children will learn to count backwards. A more complex skill related to number sense is the ability to see relationships between numbers—like adding and subtracting.

2. Representation

Making mathematical ideas “real” by using words, pictures, symbols, and objects (like blocks).
math3

3. Spatial sense

Later in school, children will call this “geometry.” But for toddlers it is introducing the ideas of shape, size, space, position, direction and movement.

math2

4. Measurement

Technically, this is finding the length, height, and weight of an object using units like inches, feet or pounds. Measurement of time (in minutes, for example) also falls under this skill area.

 

math 5

5. Patterns

Patterns are things—numbers, shapes, images—that repeat in a logical way. Patterns help children learn to make predictions, to understand what comes next, to make logical connections, and to use reasoning skills.

math4

6. Problem-solving

The ability to think through a problem, to recognize there is more than one path to the answer. It means using past knowledge and logical thinking skills to find an answer.

math1.

(From Diezmann & Yelland, 2000, and Fromboluti & Rinck, 1999.)

We may take for granted that our children will inevitably learn how to add, subtract, multiply and divide, but early math lessons establish the base for the rest of their thinking lives. “Mathematics that kids are doing in kindergarten, first, second and third grades lays the foundation for the work they are going to do beyond that,” says Linda Gojak, president of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM). “They are learning beyond just counting and numbers.” That’s why it’s so important to help children love math while they are still young. Parents can build on those first preschool lessons by counting with their children, asking them to look for patterns and recognize shapes, then moving on to numbers, Gojak says. (source)

The goal should be to make math “real” and meaningful by pointing it out in the world around you. That could include checking and comparing prices at the grocery store, driving down the street counting mailboxes, reading recipes, calculating coupons, or even measuring food or drink at the dinner table.

With so many facts and figures to memorize and apply to math problems, children learn early that math is something that requires work. That doesn’t mean that it can’t be fun; keep the pleasure in math by playing games with your children. Many games, even the ones adults play, rely on math. One game worth considering is Chutes and Ladders. A 2009 study conducted by Carnegie Mellon and the University of Maryland found that preschoolers who played the game improved math skills significantly compared to those in the study who played a different board game or did non-math tasks.

It’s the understanding that math is not just related to skills of numbers. The increased understanding of math often lends itself in other ways for developmental achievements. Math skills are just one part of a larger web of skills that children are developing in the early years—including language skills, physical skills, and social skills. Each of these skill areas is dependent on and influences the others.

Tags: